Friday, November 25, 2011

Friday Roundup: Land-walking octopus, he's having a baby, defining veggies, & lots for the ladies


Post-Thanksgiving links: All about food...or sorta food
  • You made it through Thanksgiving even though you ran out of vanilla extract? Let science help you out the next time you fall short of that one important ingredient. Scientists have compiled a list of suitable substitutes for cooks everywhere. 
  • Did you wake up this morning with fingers twice their normal size? Find out where the salt was in that Thanksgiving meal. 
  • Is pepper spray a vegetable? Oh, for the days when pizza sauce and ketchup were the only faux veggies. Here's more on pepper spray from this week's Double X Science blog of the week author, Deborah Blum. 

Speaking of pepper spray, science answers your burning questions


  • Plants flirt, play hard to get, embrace. Yes, that said "plants." 
  • He's having a baby! Carin Bondar tells us all about the world of seahorse paternal birth.
  • Chilean desert coughs up fossil whale family, puzzles scientists. Tiny scientist, huge whale fossil at link
  • Oh, those mysterious cows. Why do they come home? More important, why do they (maybe) line up along the Earth's magnetic field, and why do scientists argue about it?
  • Asking, "Are you improbable or inevitable?", Robert Krulwich tells us that the math determines that we are improbable. But we're here, so aren't we...inevitable?
  • Have you read about "the gene" for ADHD or the "drinking gene"? Stop reading that bad writing! There's a difference between a trait that a gene confers and the many, many ways someone can manifest that trait. Read more from David Dobbs over at Neuron Culture in "Enough with the 'slut gene' already: Behaviors ain't traits." 
  • Science: It's not all glamour and heels. Here's a day in the life of a scientist in Australia for those who are wondering what a scientist might do all day.
  • Speaking of how scientists might spend their days, how about spending them watching 400 YouTube videos of dogs chasing their tails? Via DiscoBlog at Discover Science.

Geek o'rama
  • Use this app to follow live cameras trained on the wild places animals live in Sri Lanka, Kenya, the UK, and other places. When you spot an animal, identify it for science. Via GeekDad at Wired, Citizen science from Instant Wild! The featured Webcam as we posted these links had captured a porcupine in action. 
  • Maybe you've never been in a lab in your life and wouldn't know PCR from a VCR. That doesn't matter when you watch this video of stop-motion animation using thousands and thousands of the tiny tubes scientists use when they conduct PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The video is actually a promotional video from vendors of equipment for this kind of lab test.


  • Conditions in Antarctica are almost unimaginable inhospitable for humans, yet scientists visit there yearly to conduct valuable research. Valuable, dangerous research, but the scenery? Stunning. Via BoingBoing. 


Hey, ladies!
  • The brain is encased in a skull for protection, with a nice fluid surrounding it for extra cushioning. But the human brain was never meant to endure years of the Newtonian physical pounding that comes with playing football. Now, researchers are beginning a brain study to test the brains of 100 former National Football League players to see what harm has been done and how to identify it early. Watch the video below. Imagine the brains inside those skulls. Recall that for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. Yikes.

  • Most parents find letting go difficult, whether it's when their child leaves for a week-long school trip or takes off for college. Add an autism spectrum condition to the mix, and what you get is a heartbreaking but heartfelt connection between mother and son that they both find difficult to stretch. 
  • Have you banked cord blood? Here's why cord blood banking may not have the payoff you expect
  • You've done it. We've done it. You walk from one room to another on a mission and when you get into the other room...you forget why you're there. Now, instead of blaming age, you can blame the door
  • Look around: Do you a see a lot of stuff you just can't bring yourself to throw away? Read this.
  • When it comes to sex--studies of it, studies of how it develops--males get a lot of the attention, and the female sex has even (gasp) been referred to as the "default" sex, as in, if there aren't signals to become male, then females develop by default. That ain't true, and as it turns out, females have a pathway dedicated to developing and maintaining them just as males do. So there, scientists. 
  • Is it hard for women to self promote? This one is about academe, but it applies across many work places.
  • Speaking of workplaces, apparently the women of Generation Y are still facing discrimination there [PDF]. 
  • People (in UK, at least) still think antibiotics work against colds. They don't. 
  • You may have read about this person's efforts to perform a butt injection on a woman using "Fix a Flat." It's probably best to just love your butt for what it is, which isn't Fix a Flat.
  • In smarter news, NASA is rolling out Aspire 2 Inspire, targeting girls interested in science. Know a girl who's interested in science? You can start with the Aspire 2 Inspire video below about women in science:

"Yet more must be done to address the projected shortfall of 280,000 math and science teachers that our nation will face by 2015. We need public and private investments in math and science education and we need a commitment to making a difference on a national scale."
She couldn't be more right. 

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