Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Two Science Online 2012 sessions for your consideration


Tomorrow, I head for North Carolina to attend Science Online 2012. I attended last year as an an information sponge and observer who knew no one and experienced some highlights and lowlights. This year, I'm attending as a participant and as a moderator of two sessions. The first session, on Thursday afternoon, is with Deborah Blum, and we'll be leading a discussion about how and when to include basic science in health and medical writing without distracting the reader. The second session I'm moderating is with Maia Szalavitz, and we'll be talking about whether or not it's possible to write in health and medicine as an advocate and still be even-handed. Session descriptions are below, as are the topics that we'll be tossing around for discussion.


Thursday, 2:45 p.m.: The basic science behind the medical research: Where to find it, how and when to use it. 
Sometimes, a medical story makes no sense without the context of the basic science--the molecules, cells, and processes that led to the medical results. At other times, inclusion of the basic science can simply enhance the story. How can science writers, especially without specific training in science, find, understand, and explain that context? As important, when should they use it? The answers to the second question can depend on publishing context, intent, and word count. This session will involve moderators with experience incorporating basic science information into medically based pieces with their insights into the whens and whys of using it. The session will also include specific examples of what the moderators and audience have found works and doesn't work from their own writing.
Deborah and I have been talking about some issues we'd like to raise for discussion. The possibilities are expansive. Some highlights:
  • Scientific explanation (and understanding) is the foundation for the best science writing. In fact, if the writer doesn’t understand the science, he or she may miss the most important part of the story. But we worry that pausing to explain can slow a story down or disrupt the flow. In print, writers deal with this by condensing and simplifying explanations and also by trying to make them lively and vivid, such as by use of analogy. But online, we use hotlinks as often if not more often for the same purpose. 
  • Reaching a balance between links and prose can be a difficult task. Another possible pitfall is writing an explanation that’s more about teaching ourselves than it is about informing a reader sufficiently for story comprehension. How many writers run into that problem?
  • On-line the temptation is to do the barest explanation and the link to the fuller account, but that approach has pros and cons. More information is available to the reader and the sourcing is transparent. But how often do readers follow those links - and how often do they return? Issues with links include that they are not necessarily evergreen or can lose reader (can be exit portal), or that the reader may not use them at all, thus losing some of the story’s relevant information.
  • A reader may actually learn more from a print story where there are no built-in escape clauses. So how does the on-line science writer best construct a story that illuminates the subject? Are readers learning as much for our work as they do from a print version? (And there's that age-old question of, Are we here to teach or to inform?)
  • Are we diminishing our own craft if we use links to let others tell the story for us? If we simply link out rather than working to supply an accessible explanation, negatives could include not pushing ourselves as writers and not expanding our own knowledge base, both essential to our craft.
  • How much do we actually owe our readers here? How much work should we expect them to do?
  • What are some ways to address issues of flow, balance, clarity? One possibility is, of course, expert quotes. Twitter is buzzing with scientists, many of whom likely would be pleased to explain a concept or brainstorm about it. (I’ve helped people who have “crowdsourced” in this way for a story, just providing an understandable, basic explanation for something complex).
  • Deborah and I are considering a challenge for the audience with a couple of basic science descriptives, to define them for a non-expert audience without using typical hackneyed phrases. Ideas for this challenge are welcome.
  • We also will feature some examples from our own work in which we think we bollixed up something in trying to explain it (overexplained or did it more for our own understanding than the reader’s) and examples from our own or others’ work of good accessible writing explaining a basic concept. We particularly want to show some explanations of quite complicated concepts--some that worked, some that didn’t. Suggestions for these are welcome!
  • Finally, when we do use links in our online writing-- what consitutes a quality link?
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Saturday, 10:45 a.m.: Advocacy in medical blogging/communication. Can you be an advocate and still be fair?
There is already a session on how reporting facts on controversial topics can lead to accusations of advocacy. But what if you *are* an avowed advocate in a medical context, either as a person with a specific condition (autism, multiple sclerosis, cancer, heart disease) or an ally? How can you, as a self-advocate or ally of an advocate, still retain credibility--and for what audience?
The genesis of this session was my experience in the autism community. I'm an advocate of neurodiversity, the basic premise of which is that people of all neurologies have potential that should be sought, emphasized, and nurtured over their disabilities. Maia, the co-moderator of our session, has her own story of advocacy to tell as a writer about pain, pain medication, mental health, and addiction. 


Either of these topics is controversial, and when you've put yourself forward as an advocate, how can you also present as a trustworthy voice on the subject? Maia and I will lead a discussion that will hit, among other things, on the following topics that we hope will lead to a vigorous exchange and input from people whose advocacy is in other arenas:
  • Can stating facts or scientific findings themselves lead to a perception of advocacy? Maia's experience is, for example, about observing that heroin doesn't addict everyone who tries it. My example is about noting the facts from research studies that have identified no autism-vaccine link.
  • Any time either of us talks about vaccines or medications for mental health, we've run into accusations of being a "Big Pharma tool" or with worse terminology. What response do such accusations require, and what constitutes a conflict of interest here? What is the level of corruption of data that's linked to pharma involvement? If they are the only possible source of funding for particular studies...do we ignore their data completely?
  • We both agree that having an advocacy bias seems to strengthen our skeptical thinking skills, that it leads us to dig into data with an attitude of looking for facts and going beyond the conventional wisdom in a way that someone less invested might not do. Would audience members agree?
  • In keeping with that, are advocates in fact in some ways more willing to acknowledge complexities and grey areas rather than reducing every situation to black and white?
  • We also want to talk about how the passion of advocacy can lead to a level of expertise that may not be as easily obtained without some bias.
  • That said, another issue that then arises is, How do you grapple with confirmation bias? We argue that you have to consciously be ready to shift angle and conclusions when new information drives you that way--just as a scientist should.
  • One issue that has come to the forefront lately is the idea of false equivalence in reporting. Does being an advocate lead to less introduction of false equivalence?
  • We argue that you may not be objective but that you can still be fair--and welcome discussion about that assertion.
  • And as Deborah and I are doing, we're planning a couple of challenge questions for discussants to get things moving and to produce some examples of our own when we let our bias interfere too much and when we felt that we remained fair.
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The entire conference agenda looks so delicious, so full of moderators and session leaders whom I admire, people I know will have insights and new viewpoints for me. The sheer expanse of choice has left me as-yet unable to select for myself which sessions I will attend. If you're in the planning stages and see something you like for either of these sessions, please join us and...bring your discussion ideas! 


See you in NC.

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