Friday, June 15, 2012

DoubleXplainer: What is a vagina?

Development of the female (right) and male (left)
sex anatomy (now unreversed; thanks Peter Edmonds!). (Source)
By Emily Willingham, DXS managing editor

What is a vagina?

First, let's just practice saying the word. Vagina. Vuh-ji-nuh. VAGINA!

OK. Why are we practicing this? So that we can avoid suffering from the fluttery sensibilities of one Rep. Mike Callton of Michigan who, upon hearing colleague Rep. Lisa Brown use the word vagina during a speech on the Michigan House floor, commented:
What she said was offensive. It was so offensive, I don't even want to say it in front of women. I would not say that in mixed company.
So here we have a fellow who is so squeamish about female anatomy that he won't even use the appropriate terminology for that anatomy in front of the people who have the body part. So beflustered are his tender feelings about the word vagina that he and the Republican leadership of the Michigan house of representatives refused to allow Rep. Brown speak again when discussing a bill about retirement of school employees. I assume they were concerned that somehow, she'd drag in the dreaded V-word again while talking about pensions.

All for the transgression of saying the word "vagina." Vagina.

You know what? It's not a mellifluous word. It has that giraffey g in it, an ugly "vuh" sound. It would probably be more palatable in general if we had decided to term this particular part of female anatomy something else, perhaps "hibiscus." Unfortunately, as with so much in anatomy, we had to rely on Latin instead of flowers, and in Latin, vagina means "sheath" or "scabbard." In other words, a place to put a sword... or a penis. Or, as I like to call them, "sperm delivery systems." 

The offensive body part is indicated. (Source)
People tend to have a misunderstanding about the vagina. They think that what they're seeing on the outside of the woman is the vagina. Unless their viewpoint is very up close and personal, it isn't. Those are the labia majora and labia minora, sometimes referred to crassly as "the lips," and making up part of the vulva (actual vulva pic, fair warning). There's a big pair (the majora) and a little pair (the minora). In men, the two sides of the big pair zip early in development to encase the testes (see top image). The little pair forms the shaft of the penis. In women, both pairs stay apart. No zipping (ETA: see good interactive explanation here). But that's not the vagina. 

Behold the clitoris. (Source
For those who are unfamiliar, you can usually find the entrance to the vagina if you peek between the labia minora. If you've never poked around knowledgeably in the female anatomy, let's orient ourselves a little. Up at the very top, tucked away under the labia majora, is the clitoral hood. Look under the hood--this is highly recommended on specific occasions--and you'll find the clitoris. This fabulous body part has far more to it than first appearances might suggest. What you see there under the hood is a small fraction of what a woman gets (recommended reading!), and we have this clitoris to thank for a woman's superior orgasmic capacities. Yes, I said "superior." The male echo of the clitoris is the glans penis (actual penis pic, fair warning), and the two anatomical features share some commonalities, including the ability to become erect. Of course, if you have a clitoris, no one notices if you become aroused in algebra class. Clitoris FTW!

Just below all of those interesting bits is the urethral opening. Men have this opening at the tip of the penis, where it serves a double duty, releasing semen and urine, preferably not simultaneously. In women, this opening is dedicated to elimination only. Follow that sucker up a few inches, and you hit the bladder. Don't go in there. That's an "exit only" kind of orifice, like your nostrils.

Move down just a tad more and... that's it! There between the labia minora, that's the vaginal opening. That's where the actual vagina is. The part of the female anatomy that got a female legislator blocked from speaking just for saying it.

There it is, the vagina, bridging the outside
and inside worlds and freaking out Michigan
legislators since time began. (Source)
The vagina is an amazing structure. Nothing else in human anatomy has the flexibility of this thing. It starts there at the opening and extends several inches into the body, leading to the cervix. Cervix means "neck" (think of cervical collars), and it is indeed the neck of the uterus. If you've given birth vaginally, you know that the baby exits the uterus through this neck, travels very quickly through the vagina, and enters the world through the vaginal opening. If you've seen the cervical or the vaginal opening, you will be astonished that an entire baby can fit through either. But the uterus, the most powerful muscle in the body, handles the cervical part, contracting and pulling and contracting and pulling until the cervix is juuuuuust wide enough for an infant human head to fit through... sort of. The vagina deals with the rest.

And once that infant--someone like you, Mike Callton--leaves the cervix, it is in the vagina. If you didn't arrive here via C-section, you got here by making your first extended trip--through a vagina. The vagina is so accommodating and flexible that it can stretch to many times its usual diameter to allow an entire human infant to exit a woman's body and enter the world. If you've never put a finger in a vagina, try it if you can find a willing partner or if you have a vagina of your own. Then imagine that cozy-feeling vagina stretching fairly effortlessly to accommodate an entire infant.

That flexibility isn't relevant only to childbirth. When a woman becomes aroused during sex, the vagina elongates to facilitate the process of sperm delivery and penis accommodation. It also self lubricates and has a ton of nerves near the opening, all part of making sex that super fun thing that people with vaginas or penises tend to think it is. But it wouldn't be so fun--or pragmatically useful--without the vagina. There. I said it. Thirty times in this single blog post. And you should, too.

These views are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily either reflect or disagree with those of the DXS editorial team. 


See also our Pregnancy 101 series, by Jeanne Garbarino, biology editor

4 comments:

  1. "Unfortunately, as with so much in anatomy, we had to rely on Latin instead of flowers"

    Hibiscus comes from the Greek word that gave us... marshmallow! :-)

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  2. I saw that when I looked up the word while I was writing this! Entertaining.

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  3. in at least three places in this post, i could not breathe for laughing. thank you.

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  4. Fantastic post. I love that the "Mike Callton" label is bobbing betwixt "cervix" and "vulva". I'm sure he does, too.

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