Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Rest in peace, Sally Ride

Photo public domain image, via Wikimedia Commons.
By Matthew Francis, DXS Physics Editor


This week—on Monday, July 23—Sally Ride passed away after a battle with pancreatic cancer. She was 61.


Dr. Ride was a physicist and passionate advocate for STEM education for girls, a position she bolstered through her fame as a former Space Shuttle astronaut. In fact, she was the first American woman in space, and only the third woman worldwide to travel into space. She flew twice aboard the Challenger, first in 1983 and then again in 1984, when she controlled the Shuttle's robotic arm to deploy a satellite. Later, she served in the investigations after both the Challenger and Columbia disasters, the only person to sit on both committees. After retiring from NASA, she started Sally Ride Science, a company devoted to providing educational materials and classroom presentations to schools, specifically with an eye toward encouraging girls in the fields of science and engineering.


I remember her flights well, as I paid a lot of attention to the space program when I was young. (I also loved the robotic arm on the Shuttle, and wanted a chance to play with it. Now I understand that, while it might resemble a video game, it's a video game with millions of dollars in equipment at stake. However, I still haven't gotten over wanting to play with robotic arms. I can admit that, right?) I was the kid who wrote letters to NASA, asking for photos and information about their spacecraft. I have the pictures they sent me in a stack on my desk right now, in fact, and I'm looking at them as I write this post. While the photos themselves predated Dr. Ride's trips into space (the last group photo in the batch comes from the third flight, STS-3, while she first flew on STS-7), my greatest interest in the Shuttle peaked during her time as as an astronaut.


Much digital ink has been spilled over the revelation about her sexual orientation—her partner in business, writing, and life for the last 27 years was Tam O’Shaughnessy, which was no secret to her family and friends but not widely known beyond. I can't really blame Dr. Ride for keeping mostly quiet about it. After all, in the 1980s, it could have been grounds for dismissal from NASA; she faced enough sexism as it was. Her very existence as a woman astronaut was symbolic, and even today the default American astronaut is a white, (presumably) heterosexual male. Although the astronaut corps is a lot more diverse than it used to be, NASA's close ties with the military and its historical homophobia have no doubt made it difficult for any astronaut to acknowledge their sexual identity openly. For Dr. Ride and her primary mission in life to encourage girls in science, I can understand her reluctance to make herself into another symbol. However, that very fact is a sad comment, that being a woman in the public sphere is enough to be considered unusual that she didn't want to bring her sexual orientation into the picture. (I don't even presume to call her a lesbian, since human sexual identity is more fluid than many of us like to admit.)


Over the last two days, many people have written eulogies, reminiscences, tributes, and biographies; I'm not sure I can add much to those. Here are some of the best:
  • Nadia Drake's personal story from her childhood brought tears to my eyes. Similarly, I love astronomer Meg Urry's tribute.
  • Here's the big New York Times official obituary, which (as you might expect) is quite good and thorough.
  • While we rightfully celebrate Sally Ride's accomplishments, let's face it: the United States was really late in sending women into space. Institutional sexism delayed women astronauts far longer than should be acceptable in any civilized nation, and the locker-room culture at NASA during that era bears a lot of responsibility for the problem. Thirteen women trained to be part of the Mercury program, but were barred from ever flying. I lost a lot of respect for John Glenn when I found out he actively worked against allowing women to fly.
  • Natalie Wolchover at Space.com examines why there aren't openly gay astronauts in much more detail; here's another post on a similar personal note, from a lesbian astronomer.
  • An obituary from BuzzFeed, with comments from Ride's sister, Bear. (Seriously, isn't it also awesome to have a sister nicknamed "Bear"?)
Please leave your recollections of Sally Ride in the comments.

1 comment:

  1. When I was a wee sprog, we had a series of books about famous women: Marie Curie, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Helen Keller... and Sally Ride. She was one of my heroes even before I knew why it was important that women should be astronauts if they wanted.

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