The degendering effect of social networks and why that might be OK

[Ed. note: I (Emily) just attended the National Association of Science Writers annual conference in Raleigh, NC, where I moderated a session on managing the information deluge that can overwhelm those of us who deeply engage in social media. During the session, Tinker Ready noted the all-woman makeup of our panel and asked about the role of social media in helping women in science. She also asked me a few questions after the session. Below is a repost of the resulting piece, which first appeared at Nature’s SpotOn Website. SpotOn focuses on how science is communicated and carried out online, something that obviously interests our Double X Science team a great deal. We repost here with permission, and our thanks to the SpotOn folks.]
The tweet read “What makes this panel rare at science conf? #sciwri12deluge”. The attached photos featured four women leading a session at this weekend’s National Association of Science Writers meeting.
Emily Willingham
Credit: Tinker Ready
Moderator and science writer Emily Willingham said she and Scientific American blog editor, Bora Zivkovic, planned it that way when they were putting together a Twitter session for the Raleigh, North Carolina meeting.
“We just thought —how often do you get to see that?” Willingham said, with a nod to the panel.   “I go to a lot of scientific conferences and you don’t see this that much.”
The topic of the session was how to manage Twitter.  But, the panel’s subtext was: women have a prominent place in scientific social networks. And, said Willingham and others, social networks have a role in promoting women in science.
“What you see on Twitter is a kind of de-gendering, in a positive way, of what people have to say,” she said.  “You present more with words on Twitter than with anything else. Words and personality are important. “
Panel member Marie-Claire Shanahan, a science communication professor at the University of Alberta, agreed.
“I don’t pay that much attention on Twitter to whether anyone is male or female,” she said “They are often just a Twitter handle.” Gender “is so much not part of the first impression on Twitter.”
Nor is anything below the neck. “Unfortunately,” Willingham said “…That’s useful.”’
“You see people whose heads you recognize and you think, ‘wow, I had no idea what their bodies looks like’,” she said.  “By that time, you’ve already fixed who they are in terms of their personality and what you think of them.
Twitter and other social networks also offer a way for women scientists to connect. It allows women who work at home to stay plugged in. Willingham home schools two of her children. She also manages the Double X Science site, which promises to bring “evidence-based science writing to women.”
“In between, I’m watching Twitter go by,” she said.  “I work at home, but in this way, I’m connected to humanity. I’m connected to my colleagues, I’m connected to the conversations that are going on about sciences.”  
–  Tinker Ready
The opinions expressed in this post do not necessarily agree or conflict with those of the DXS editorial team and contributors.
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About Emily

Emily, co-founder and editor in chief of DoubleXScience, is an editor and a research scientist whose investigations involve sex determination/differentiation and developmental endocrinology, toxicology, genetics, and physiology. She also is the ambigendered partner of a Viking and the mother of three very interesting sons.